Even if someone makes something terrible—like the music the Insane Clown Posse makes—at least they’re doing something that speaks to them. And they kept going even though people told them it was terrible. And they found their audience, and now they built a community around their work. Look, you couldn’t pay me to listen to their music, but I still feel like I have more in common with the Insane Clown Posse than I do with someone who just sits on the sidelines and shits on other people’s work and who never puts themselves on the line.
Tom Scharpling in Mike Sacks’s Poking a Dead Frog (via nickdouglas)

Oh, how true

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jowcol:

When I was a young boy, I put on Stockhausen or Albert Ayler, and I said, “I hate this music. I hate it! But what is it? Who are these people and what the hell are they doing?” I don’t feel our young people get that feeling anymore, or when they think about playing jazz, they’re really thinking about idiomatic certainty. Jazz equals walking bass, drum set, chord changes, a particular kind of voicing. But it’s all a known space. If I knew what it was about then I wanted to go to something else, because I came to see that music wasn’t about just style. What attracted me to the discipline of music was this component that I couldn’t understand, but I could sense, in every kind of music. It helped me to see how little I knew about music. It also helped me to learn humility, because whatever you can do there’s always someone who can do it better. There’s always someone in a different idiom who can do something that pushes my buttons and makes me want to work harder because I’ve been inspired.


Perfectly stated by the eloquent Anthony Braxton

jowcol:

When I was a young boy, I put on Stockhausen or Albert Ayler, and I said, “I hate this music. I hate it! But what is it? Who are these people and what the hell are they doing?” I don’t feel our young people get that feeling anymore, or when they think about playing jazz, they’re really thinking about idiomatic certainty. Jazz equals walking bass, drum set, chord changes, a particular kind of voicing. But it’s all a known space. If I knew what it was about then I wanted to go to something else, because I came to see that music wasn’t about just style. What attracted me to the discipline of music was this component that I couldn’t understand, but I could sense, in every kind of music. It helped me to see how little I knew about music. It also helped me to learn humility, because whatever you can do there’s always someone who can do it better. There’s always someone in a different idiom who can do something that pushes my buttons and makes me want to work harder because I’ve been inspired.

Perfectly stated by the eloquent Anthony Braxton

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robertreich:

Do you recall a time in America when the income of a single school teacher or baker or salesman or mechanic was enough to buy a home, have two cars, and raise a family?

I remember. My father (who just celebrated his 100th birthday) earned enough for the rest of us to live…

Let’s get retro

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The suit claims the woman behind the accusations was a liar who made “despicable, false, outrageous, and defamatory statements” about Oberst last December.

The Associated Press generally does not name people who say they were sexually assaulted.

Oberst’s lawsuit says the woman posted accusations that Oberst raped her a decade ago in North Carolina after his brother, her middle school English teacher, introduced the two at an Oberst show. The lawsuit says she also claimed Oberst punched her in the face and that she was 16 at the time.

Oberst, an Omaha, Neb., resident best known for his work with Bright Eyes, is seeking monetary damages, attorney fees and other costs.

He says the media coverage that resulted from the three posts in the comments section of a blog has damaged his career, especially in New York where most of the major music publishing houses are headquartered. He says he was in the company of his brother, bandmates or then-girlfriend at the time of the claims. The suit also says the woman who made positive social media comments about Oberst in the past decade.

I will gladly give this a boost

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zenpencils:

BILL WATTERSON ‘A cartoonist’s advice’

Wow, I could not have discovered this at a more opportune time.

(Source: zenpencils.com)

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drueisms:

War is war. Hell is hell.


On point

drueisms:

War is war. Hell is hell.

On point

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oldtimefamilybaseball:

I’m a fan of NPR. Literally, I “Like” NPR on Facebook. That’s partly why I came across the above article an this afternoon. From a baseball fan’s perspective, that’s a little like asking, “Mariano Rivera’s Cutter Can Devastate, So Why Don’t All Pitchers Throw It?”

The article was spurred by Baltimore’s recent hiring of Hall of Fame Knuckleballer Phil Niekro to school three of its minor leaguers in the art of throwing the knuckleball. NPR follows the usual narrative we’ve seen - the knuckleball is finicky and can resurrect careers. Knuckleballers are rare, etc.

The reporter even consults Alan Nathan, a physics professor who runs The Physics of Baseball site. The article concludes that the knuckleball is both hard to actually pitch and comes with a stigma attached.

What it doesn’t mention is the truth.

That the knuckleball is like an ex - you pick things up when you’re down, and everything’s great. And then your tumultuous relationship throws you back into a pit of despair, but you remember the good times, and you stick it out. Sure enough, those seven inning, eight strikeout performances come back into the picture, and that four inning, ten run monstrosity form the previous week is forgotten.

That the knuckleball is solely responsible for the creation of the word “frenemy.”

That the knuckleball is like a gift from a race of superior beings who wanted to encapsulate the joys and hardships of playing and watching baseball into a single, beautiful pitch.

Outsiders - they just don’t get it.

See: R.A. Dickey

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drivinon9:

robotcosmonaut:

Here Comes A Regular

love seeing the lyrics that didn’t make it / got switched around
EDITING!


Wow. So cool

drivinon9:

robotcosmonaut:

Here Comes A Regular

love seeing the lyrics that didn’t make it / got switched around

EDITING!

Wow. So cool

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A lot of what I did in X was making fun of ’70s music… I remember watching the Doobie Brothers on this Christmas rock concert. The songs were already boring and pretentious to begin with, and then they did this one where the whole band stopped and the guitar player took this solo-wheedly-wheedly-wheedly-playing lots of notes and making all these faces and shaking his hair. And he wasn’t even doing anything. There were a lot of notes, but it was a real easy riff, you know? I noticed that all of these rock groups were always making these faces, trying to make it look hard but not really playing anything. So as a joke, I would play something difficult and just smile and not look at the guitar and act like it was nothing. To me, that was funny. In the beginning, most of the audience got it, but after a while, people looked at it and thought, ‘Well, he isn’t doing anything hard, or he wouldn’t look like he was.’
Billy Zoom, in a 1998 interview. (via oneweekoneband)

I always loved the way he did this and now I know why he did it

26 notes